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Jrisi itibaren Otice, Çek Cumhuriyeti itibaren Otice, Çek Cumhuriyeti

Okuyucu Jrisi itibaren Otice, Çek Cumhuriyeti

Jrisi itibaren Otice, Çek Cumhuriyeti

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Oldukça ok, iyi biraz tahmin edilebilir okuyun.

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Ann'in Kitaplarını Sevin hepsi eşit derecede iyiydi. Ne zaman yeni bir tane görsem okumak için rafa koymalıyım!

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Ragmop is a crazy romp through conspiracy theories, bizarre religious speculation, and quantum hocus-pocus. Walton's art is like a cross between old Looney Tunes cartoons and 1960's Marvel comics. I first encountered Ragmop when it was serialized in comic book form back in 1994 and was very disappointed when Walton announced in the back of issue 12 that he was forced to cancel the series due to low sales. Browsing online one day I was pleased to discover that not only had the series been collected in a graphic novel but Walton had completed the story as well. Reading the collection I was surprised to find that Walton had rewritten parts to bring it up to date to a post-9/11 world. I have to question the wisdom of the rewriting. Imagine the Smothers Brothers taking episodes of their old TV series and dubbing over jokes about Richard Nixon with jokes about George W. Bush. Topical humor does not age well, but like George Lucas' continued fiddling with Star Wars, attempts to update just serve to lessen the whole. I'm giving the collection 4 stars for how much I loved it 15 years ago. The intervening years have lessen my enjoyment of conspiracy theories and all the nonsense about quantum theory meaning "anything can happen at anytime" just irritates me.

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56. "In the alternate New York of Colson Whitehead's gritty, brainy first novel, The Intuitionist, the elevator inspectors union is split into two factions. The upstart Intuitionists have their own candidate for Guild chair, and are intent on ousting the current chair, leader of the nuts-and-bolts Empiricists. When a brand-new elevator on Lila Mae's beat suddenly and inexplicably plummets 40 floors -- suffering a supposedly impossible "total freefall" -- Lila Mae gets dragged into the election year battle, and soon she's chasing after the lost notebooks of Intuitionism's founder, James Fulton. Rumor has it that Fulton, author of the classic text Theoretical Elevators, had designed the perfect elevator, then hid his blueprints just before his death. Such a device would remake the topography of the city as radically as Otis' first lift, bringing on "the second elevation" and upsetting the Guild's delicate balance of powers." This was a slow read and I couldn't finish it. At times it read fast like a John Grisham novel, at other times it dragged through a boring montage of poetic descriptions and intricate elevator workings.